Feng shui for your kitchen

The kitchen is the hub of activity of your home; it is imperative for the health and happiness of your family that you keep it infused with positive energy

neat and clean kitchen

Whether you are at home or not, the energy of your home environment has the ability to lift or drain your spirits throughout the day. It is thought that if the flow of your chi is strong it will support all your endeavours in and out of the home. Similarly, if it is weak, it will pull you down. Feng shui is like acupuncture for you r home. With the use of needles, acupuncture is known to release any blockages in the flow of chi in order to create a steady movement of energy to all areas. Feng Shui works in much the same way. Your house is similar to a second body, as that is where you spend most of your time; as such, it is an expression of who you are.

Here are seven easy ideas for a happy and healthy kitchen

1. Free from clutter

Keep the kitchen clutter-free and make sure that you actually use everything that is stowed away in your cupboards. The kitchen is a hub of activity, a place to enjoy food and conversation. The atmosphere should be fresh, warm and bright.

2.  The stove beside the fridge

If your stove and refrigerator are next to each other, then you should create a symbolic distance between them. A great deal of conflict is generated when there is mixing of the energy of the hot fire element represented by the stove and the cold water element represented by the refrigerator. To fix this, you can either put a mirror on the refrigerator facing out toward the stove, which symbolically pushes the refrigerator away and expands the stove area, or you can place a faceted crystal between the two to create a balance. Also, if you have the space, you can put some plants between the fridge and stove to create an energetic barrier.

3. The sink

Keep the sink clean and unblocked with a stopper in it when not in use. Make sure that the garbage disposal unit is working well if you have one.

Knife stand4. Knives

Keep your knives safely away in a drawer or in a knife block.

5. The view

Hang a crystal in the kitchen window as it attracts energy from outside and serves to deflect any negativity in case you have an unsightly view out of your window.

Under the sink
Pic: Licensed under [CC BY 2.0] from Goedeker’s [flickr]

6. Under the sink

Be aware of what poisons are located underneath your sink. If you were to take all the cleaning products that you have under your sink and pour them all into a bucket, you would probably find huge amounts of poisonous chemicals. Many of these products are extremely toxic. They are dangerous to inhale or may cause an adverse reaction if they get on your skin, excluding the fact that they are extremely poisonous if swallowed. There are so many ecologically friendly products available in the market now that it makes much more sense to replace the toxic products you currently own with ones that are much safer to have in your home. They might vary in price slightly, but it is definitely worth limiting the amount of poison you keep under your sink, and in case you want to keep it cheap, you can always use products like baking soda, borax, white vinegar and cornstarch.

7. Inside your refrigerator

If you tend to buy food in packets or jars, then get into a habit of reading what is on the label. The more real ingredients in a product, the better it is for you. Conversely, the more a product label reads like a chemistry experiment, the worse the product is for you. If you don’t know what a word on the label means, then look it up. If there are additives in something, be aware that they won’t provide your body with the nutrients it needs for health or energy. As a rule of thumb, you will tend to find more additives in foods that have low nutritional value. If you find you really can’t do without your favourite food, at least try to find a more natural alternative.

Excerpted with permission from How happy is your home? by Sophie Keller; published by Harlequin.


A version of this article first appeared in the March 2015 issue of Complete Wellbeing.

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