Unlearning and relearning how money works

Until you unlearn the flawed premises that surround money, you can’t unravel its mystery

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Working for money is only a small part of the process of creating money. There are many parts involved in riding a bicycle. Working is like pedalling. It is an important part, but there is much more involved. If all you know is how to pedal, you’re destined to fall on your face. Unfortunately, most people think pedalling is all there is to riding a bike, so they are pedalling harder and harder but getting nowhere. They aren’t learning how to balance or steer. If they are staying upright at all, it is only because they’ve taken to riding one of those stationary exercise bikes, where you pedal like mad but stay firmly planted in one place.

Everyone who works with our company is constantly refining their abilities to create money, not simply waiting for a paycheck. We are more than a business; we are also a school. The people who work with us are training to be generalists in business and can swap places with anyone throughout our organisation. We are constantly training everyone associated with us to be generalists in business. And although we have a few strict rules and policies, everyone is encouraged to experiment, to make mistakes, correct them and report their findings at our meetings. Our business is always growing. All of us are continuously learning and changing. It is definitely not a boring place to work in, believe me! Here’s something else I’d like to point out: there is no such thing as a crazy idea in our organisation. In fact, if someone isn’t experimenting with some crazy new idea and making mistakes, we encourage them to do so.

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Adapted from Be Rich & Happy by Robert Kiyosaki; Published in India by Jaico Books; Reproduced with permission. 

A version of this was first published in the August 2013 issue of Complete Wellbeing.

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