Happiness is a stew!

The recipe for a lifetime of happiness is a simple mix of a few key ingredients

Man happy near sea-shore

Happiness is not something that you can buy off the shelf. Neither can you borrow or steal it. It’s something that you should [and can] find for yourself. Better still, create for yourself. For that, all you need is:

A dollop of Optimism

Being optimistic doesn’t mean being unrealistic. Sure, life has its ups and downs, but optimists have a positive attitude to both. They look at problems as challenges rather than obstacles; instead of brooding they find solutions. So try looking at the glass as half full.

A handful of Friendship

Our friends are our confidants. It is important to have a good, even if small, circle of friends. They might not always solve our problems but can help us de-stress just by being a sounding board.

A dash of Positivity

Life can make us cynical. We tend to focus on the negative and overlook the positive aspects. Start appreciating simple pleasures and count each as a blessing. In time, acknowledging the good will make you a positive person.

A helping of Gratitude

There are so many who are less fortunate than we are. Millions don’t have what we take for granted: food, water, a home and an education. Yet, we are unhappy with what we have. While it is not wrong to want more, and work towards our betterment, we must not forget to be grateful for what we are blessed with.

A spoonful of Introspection

We get so busy in our lives that we don’t have time even for ourselves. But it is important to take some time out, once in a while, to be quiet and introspect. When looking at the larger picture of life, we must also look within. Questioning our actions and our reactions in this state of calmness offers new perspectives. Regular introspection can transform your life. You will have better relationships, and will be a happier person. Regular introspection helps us realise our habitual behaviour patterns, which helps us replace the bad habit of reacting negatively with a controlled positive response.

This was first published in the May 2012 issue of Complete Wellbeing.

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