Anything can be healed

We must get away from the idea that there is only one way that things work, that we have just one reality

We are each a consciousness in a body. We each decide what to think and what to feel. We choose our perceptions, and our perceptions create our reality. Our perceptions are the subjective way we interpret all of the information coming into our consciousness from the world around us.

It is as if there is a bubble around each of us. Some of the information coming through this bubble is filtered to the surface and presented to our conscious attention to be noticed. The rest does not register consciously, but travels through the bubble and is stored at deeper levels of our consciousness. Our ideas, beliefs, desires, and feelings colour the bubble filtering our perceptions; so much so that people with different bubbles looking at the same thing can have totally different perceptions of what they are watching.

Purple bubble

A person in a red bubble, for example, will see the world as red, while a person in a blue bubble will see it as blue, and we can imagine the conversation between these two discussing the colour of the world. From a certain point of view, they are both correct about what they report, and all of their perceptions affirm their truth. Yet from another point of view, perhaps neither perception represents objective reality. Perhaps the world is neither red nor blue. All that we know to be true for sure is that one person sees it as red and another as blue, so we have a sense of the nature of each of the bubbles, each of the filters. In this way, we have a basis for communication and exchange of ideas.

While we each may see the same events in the outer world, our respective bubbles colour our interpretation of these events. Looking at our interpretation can give us an idea of the nature of our own beliefs and perceptions, since it is these that ‘colour’ our bubbles. Someone believing that competition and conflict are universal will see only that, while someone else may just as clearly see that the world is full of people motivated by love and expressing it, and sometimes reacting to the perception that it is not there.

Creating our own reality

It is easy to see how our perceptions can then predispose us to acting in certain ways that not only play into the apparent scenario we perceive, but actually create and continue it. A man insecure about his lover, for example, can actually drive away that lover with his insecurities, justifying his perceptions, proving that he was right, yet at the same time, having created the scenario in the first place.

There’s a story about a man whose car had a flat tyre, not far from a farmhouse in a remote farming community. The man thought, “There’s a farmhouse. I’m sure that they have tools that I can use to fix the flat tyre.”

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This excerpt was published in the December 2014 issue of Complete Wellbeing.

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