Those walking to work less likely to have high blood pressure

Building physical activity into the daily routine by walking, cycling or using public transport to get to work is good for personal health

walk-to-workMen and women walking to work are 40 per cent less likely to develop diabetes than those who drive, according to a new study.

Researchers at Imperial College London and University College London investigated results of a  survey of 20,000 people across the UK.

They found that those who cycle, walk,  travel by bus/train or a similar public transport had a lower risk of being overweight than those driving to work or hailing a cab. People who walk to work were also 17 per cent less likely to have high blood pressure than persons who drove to work. The risk of diabetes was half among those  who cycled to work compared to those who chose to drive to work.

The study was  published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The researchers suggested that the risk of serious health problems like heart attacks could be reduced by limiting the use of cars.

"This study highlights that building physical activity into the daily routine by walking, cycling or using public transport to get to work is good for personal health ," said Anthony Laverty, from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London.

19 per cent of working adults using private transport [a car, motorcycle or a taxi] – to reach their workplace were obese.

The study also found many variations in how different parts of the UK use their public transport facilities. Public transport was used most in London, at 52 per cent, compared with just five per cent in Northern Ireland.

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