Migraine moms tend to have cranky babies

Mothers with a history of migraine were two-and-a-half times more likely to have colic than infants whose mothers did not have a history of migraine

Doctor with laptop and woman in doctor's office holding babyWomen suffering from migraine already have a lot to go through. And going by new research published by the American Academy of Neurology, things aren't looking good for them, especially in motherhood. The research suggests that women who have a history of  migraine are more likely to have babies with colic [excessive crying in healthy infants] than women without a history of migraine.

“Since migraine is a highly genetic disorder, our study suggests that infant colic may be an early sign that a child may be predisposed toward migraine headache later in life,” said study author Amy Gelfand, MD, child neurologist with the Headache Center at the University of California, San Francisco, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Colic may be another example of a childhood periodic syndrome, which is often a precursor to migraine.”

The study found that babies whose mothers had a history of migraine were two-and-a-half times more likely to have colic than infants whose mothers did not have a history of migraine. Overall, 29 percent of infants whose mothers had migraine had colic compared to 11 percent of those babies whose mothers did not have migraine.

“This may be helpful in more accurately identifying children who have childhood periodic syndromes by asking about a history of infant colic,” said Gelfand.

American Academy of Neurology

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